diy headboard wall – part 2 by andrea beckman

At last….I’ve finally completed my ‘headboard wall’!  If you have not checked out my first post diy upholstered headboard – part 1, I started this project over two months ago and it has been on my ‘to-do’ list for about seven!  None the less it’s finally complete and I’m happy to say it turned out beautiful, it’s exactly what I wanted!  There were a couple bumps along the way, one which included me almost firing my assistant (Dad), but he pulled through!  Actually I couldn’t have done it without him.  I had the vision but he was the brains behind this operation, and together we brought it to life.

Let me quickly refresh your memory…

BEFORE

 

  1. I fell for a pair of wall lamps and purchased them for my new bedroom, which at that point was only a figment of my imagination.
  2. I found a beautiful apartment and moved in!
  3. Unfortunately, the only wall that my bed could fit on has windows located on each side, thus providing no home for my wall lights….This momentarily put a little hitch in my giddy-up, but I quickly determined that I could work with this.

Solution……

 

VISION

 

  1. Build a headboard with side extensions for my wall lights to attach to.
  2. While I’m at it, construct floating shelves to act as bedside tables.

We first created the actual upholstered headboard which was part – 1.

 

UPHOLSTERED HEADBOARD

 

Now for part – 2…

Step 1 We first built the two side extensions ahead of time.  I decided to use planks of Western Red Cedar to construct these units.  I chose Western Red Cedar because of it’s wood grain, color and it was readily available.  As I mentioned in my first post, I wanted to create a slightly rustic look while keeping it refined.  This is why I decided to leave the wood untreated and in it’s natural state.  I also liked the way it contrasted with the upholstered headboard and added to the mix of textures!

 

SIDE EXTENSIONS

 

To create these pieces we used (4) 1 x 12 planks of Cedar and attached them to a 1 x 2 (on edge) sub-frame using brad nails (head-less nail).  This gave us a clean flush look with the structural members behind.  To design the box units we used (3) 1 x 10’s on the top and sides, and a 1 x 12 for the bottom.  I originally intended on using the 1 x 10’s for the entire box, but I did not plan for enough material and we were short.  So, to prevent spending more $ and having additional waste, I decided to suck it up and put the left over 1 x 12’s to use.  Surprisingly, once in place I really liked the way it looked.  I love when this sort of thing happens…I love it when you have to get creative due to lack of funds, or a ‘mistake’ ends up turning into something great!  In some unexpected way, the deeper piece at the bottom provided this subtle detail that really added a nice touch.  In fact, I wish I could say I planned it that way!  We also used brad nails to create these box units and attached additional screws from the back and bottom to give it extra support and strength.  While this is not engineered to be used as a step ladder, it will hold somewhere between 30 – 50 pounds.

 

Step 2.  We attached the side extensions to the sub-frame of the headboard using (3) 1-5/8″ Phillips drive screws (cordless drill is a must)!

 

STEP 2

STEP 2

 

We built the ‘headboard wall’ in three separate/ modular units.  We used removable screws so that it could be easily dis-assemble or reassemble at a later date.  This also allows the different pieces to be used independently of one another, not to mention it would be extremely difficult to move as one unit.

Note: Before attaching the final section, be sure to secure a ladder behind the unit.  Because this was designed to take up the entire wall space, once you’ve attached the last section, you might have a difficult time getting out from behind!  We used the ladder numerous times!

 

Step 3.

STEP 3

 

Once the last section was installed and everything was flush with the top of the headboard, we attached a 1 x 4 board (that ran the entire length) behind the unit.  This was attached to the verticals of each section’s sub-frame and provided extra rigidity to the entire unit.  In addition, we attached a small 1 x 4 piece of lumber behind the center of the headboard.  This also attached to the 1 x 4 on the back side (see below).  This was necessary for step 4 and continued to provide extra rigidity.

 

Step 3

 

Step 4.  The final design detail included a top piece that capped off the entire structure and visually tied it all together.  Again, it also added to the overall structural support.  This was screwed into 5 places…the top of each section’s sub-frame and the center 1 x 4 piece that was just added in step 3.  This really gave it a nice finished look!

 

STEP 4

 

Below is why you need the ladder….

 

HALF an HOUR LATER.....IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR SPEED, THIS IS NOT YOUR GUY!

 

Step 5.  Lastly, to secure the entire unit in place and ensure this bad boy wasn’t going anywhere, we used (2) 5″ – ‘L’ brackets and attached the sub-frame to the inside of each window jam, using one screw.  This last step solidified the entire unit and it’s as sturdy as a tank…oh yeah!

 

Final Steps….

 

PUTTING UP CURTAINS AND INSTALLING WALL LIGHTS

 

INSTALLING WALL LIGHTS

 

Side note…I do know how to work a power drill, but Patrick always insist on doing it himself!

 

Final Result!

 

AFTER

 

 

AFTER

 

 

AFTER

 

 

AFTER

 

I think what surprised me most with the final result, was how much larger it made my entire room feel!  That was nice and I’m not going to lie…it does add a touch of sophistication that I do enjoy!

The entire headboard definitely possesses that home-made touch and is not perfect.  It is however ‘perfectly – imperfect’ which is perfect for me!  As always, it’s about ‘blooming where you’re planted’…creating a space that you love, utilizing what you love and most of all, with the ones you love~

 


 


 

 

DIY Upholstered Headboard Wall – Part 1 by Andrea Beckman

Every design starts with a vision.  This vision is often inspired by a particular piece you love…a chair, a table or piece of artwork.  Whatever it may be, it begins to set the tone and direction in which you design; but sometimes certain things such as layout or window placement can hinder that vision.

Prior to moving into my new apartment, I had a vision for my bedroom and it included wall lights.  Refined and somewhat industrial looking is what I had in mind.  So when I came across these wall lights (on sale + coupon) it did the trick.  I bought them and set them aside for my future space.

wall lights

Now, let’s fast forward to the apartment that I found and am currently living in…..

Challenge: There is only one wall that works for the bed to go on.  That wall has windows on it…well how about that!  Now where do I hang these wall lights that I am committed to using?

before

Solution: Create a “headboard wall”.  Build a headboard that has end pieces extending past and in front of my windows.  Mount my wall lights to the side extensions.  To complete the look, cantilever shelving to act as bed-side tables.

sketch

My thought…this will create a dramatic focal point that is cozy and most of all, house my wall lights!  When I shared this with a few others, their response was, “And cover up the windows”?  Well yes,  I figure the windows are tall enough where they can still allow for plenty of light in the space, and because they are tall you’re still able to appreciate them.

This is no new concept, but it is new for me and my assistant (dad) to build.  Important Note: Whether or not this turns out is still TBD…it’s not complete yet!!  I have only completed the first phase which is the upholstered headboard.  You will have to stay tuned for my follow up post which will include the finished product.

Now we begin, DIY Headboard – part I, creating the actual upholstered headboard!

Step 1: Decide what you want your headboard to look like.  Is it going to be arched, scalloped, squared?  What material do you want to use…solid, striped, patterned? Do you want to add any details?

Because I knew this would be next to my lampshades and wood planks I wanted a material that would provide a nice contrast.  I chose a heavy textured linen in a charcoal with blue undertones.

My inspiration:

West Elm: Nailhead Upholstered Headboard

When I came across West Elm’s upholstered nailhead headboard I loved it!  It was exactly what I had in mind.  While this headboard is reasonably priced and I’d love to have the ‘real deal’, it was still more than I could afford.  I already owned a huge roll of imitation nailheads that I bought years ago and this would give me a reason to finally use them.

West Elm: Nailhead Upholstered Headboard

Step 2: Create your frame:  We created a frame out of 2×4’s.  Three verticals and two horizontal with an overall dimension of 26″ x 60″.  This is for a queen size bed.

STEP 2

We then covered the frame by running 1 x 6’s horizontally to create the face.  You could also use 3/4″ plywood along with many other material options.  We used 1×6’s because we already had it to work with.

Step 2

Step 3: We adhered 2″ foam to the face and left a 1-1/2″ perimeter along the top and two sides.  We did this to allow for the nailheads.  To attach the foam to the wood we used a heavy duty spray glue.  That baby is going no where!

Step 3

Step 4: We then stretched an inexpensive white backing material to cover and give the backside a finished look.

Step 4

Step 5: We stretched 3/4″ backing material over the foam and stapled to the backside.

Step 5

Headboard with the batting on it.

Head board with Batting

Step 6: Finally the fun part, attaching the fabric….or maybe the not so fun part, five re-dos over!  Because my material had a very distinct weave in it, it was very difficult to keep it perfectly perpendicular and strait.  When stretching it, the slightest pull too hard in any one direction would make the whole thing look crooked and off.  My material also had some natural give to it that made this even more challenging.  The more tout the material the easier!!

Step

Before adding nail heads

Finished product!

Completed Headboard

 

close up

 

Stay tuned for “DIY headboard – Part 2” to see the finished product and how it all comes together (cross my fingers)!

 

the cover-up by andrea beckman

When I recently moved into my new apartment I absolutely loved everything except for two things….

1. My extremely short bathroom sink.

2. The brick facade above my fireplace!

Now, I’m a huge fan of exposed brick and will take it wherever I can, but this…this is not your beautiful brick.  This my friends is z-brick!  For those who don’t know, z-brick is a type of wall covering.  A thin brick facing that in this case was applied over plaster.  This may not be a catastrophe to many but it becomes a slightly bigger challenge when you are renting!  As most renters know you are usually pretty limited in what you can and can’t alter.

before...bad, bad, bad!

Challenge: How to completely change the look of the z-brick wall, with out really changing it?

Solution: Build a relatively light weight structure to cover the undesirable with something desirable!   Key: Do not permanently alter or attach to the undesirable.  I chose to use wallpaper as my desirable.  With so many amazing wallpaper designs to chose from I knew I could find something to create the look I wanted.

I should probably mention..the fireplace itself was not and is not bad, in fact it’s wonderful!  It still has the original decorative tile and cast iron surround/cover that is exquisite!  It has so much detail and gives off this romantic ‘secret garden like’ vibe that you can’t help but love.  OK, so maybe I’m the only one who sees it that way but in any case it’s beautiful.  I actually felt that I owed it to the fireplace to some how rid it of the dreary facade that had been placed upon it and breathe new life into it.

cast iron cover

Step 1.

Recruit some one to help because you may need a hand.  I often select my father for such projects.  He doesn’t always have a choice so this works out well!

constructing the frame

We first built a frame out of 1 x 2’s and made it the exact size of the chimney chase wall.  I decided to build this at my parents house so that I could make use of my fathers tools and lending hand.  However,  this did raise an issue with transportation.  Due to it’s large dimensions, the only way to transport the unit was by constructing it in two sections and hinging it down the center so that we could fit it in their van.

constructing the frame

Step 2.

We attached wafer board to the face of the frame and along the sides to cover the return of the chase wall.  We chose to use wafer board because it is cheap, relatively light weight and substantial enough for the intended use.

step 2

Once that was built and eventually transported to my apartment, we placed the unit directly around the chase.  It actually stood in place by itself but for additional support we tacked a nail at the top and bottom of each side, along the return.  I did not intend on hanging much weight from it, as my goals was to have nothing screwed and nothing anchored to the wall!

unit placed around chase

Step 3.

Once in place we filled in any gaps or imperfections with spackle and smoothed the surface by applying a backing paper.  The only reason this project required spackle was to help conceal an error on our part (or mine)…oops!

backing paper applied and it already looks better!

Step 4.

We then hung the wall paper and this is where things got a little ugly for us.  Our main problem was that we were running low on glue and ended up diluting it a bit too much!  This caused the glue to dry very quickly and parts of the paper would dry before we were able to line up the design and the seams.  Despite our personal challenges in this area, overall the project was pretty simple.

dad smoothing the paper

The final result….

the cover-up complete!

There are other things I could have done using this same concept but I chose to wallpaper.  I was looking for something dramatic and graphic that complimented the already existing elements of the fireplace itself.  I like how the motifs in the paper tie in so nicely with that of the tile and the scrolls in the cast iron cover.  All of the motifs look up but then scroll back down (in both the paper and decorative tile)…it’s this beautiful medley that gracefully takes your eye all the way up and all the way back down again.

wallpaper close up

mantel close up

With a little patience and precision this can easily be done, and you can create the look you want!  Where there’s a will there’s a way to always bloom where you’re planted….bad z-brick and all!

the cover-up!

 

DIY – Chevron Pattern Dresser – Kimberly Reuther

Those who know me best are well aware of my ability to envision possibilities in almost any space and are always pleased with the finished product. However, knowing my visionary ability means they are also cognizant of my low tolerance for detail work and executing these visions myself.

Therefore, when I conceptualized transforming this drab dresser into a modern classic a mere 2 weeks before my Habitat for Humanity deadline, I received a lot of eyebrow raises and not a lot of paintbrushes raised. Which is not quite what I had hoped, as I am also acutely aware of my shortcomings. But alas, I couldn’t let my weakness (nor sleep) stand in the way of my imagination.

See before shots of the dresser and a pillow which provided inspiration (and most of the eyebrow raises, I confess).

before shot

 

inspiration photo

Luckily, my dad was willing to help with the basecoat of paint and then turned it over, in his words “you’re on your own, kid”. He didn’t want to touch that chevon pattern with a ten foot pole. Neither did my aunt, the queen of DIY projects, who I thought would surely have some sage advice.

So, I guess it really was up to me…hmmm, where to begin? On top of my habitat project, I had quite a few other things on my plate and didn’t have a lot of time to devote to getting this completed. The first few evenings were spent trying to get the dimensions of the chevron pattern down and figure out a template to apply the contrasting color. I painted the drawers white and was using the orange as the contratst. I would give you pointers but I honestly don’t know how I figured it out and I threw away the paint-crusted template as soon as I was done. I got so frustrated at one point that I almost gave up. The template moved while I tried to apply the orange paint which required 6 hours of touching up the white and creating “edges” where there were none. My dad came back on the project to apply the clear coats and the handles since I had run out of time & energy!

 

chocolate paint coat applied

chevron pattern on drawers!

After all the work, I am very happy with how the dresser turned out. The homeowner is extremely pleased as well. I don’t know that I would attempt it again but I feel proud that I was able to execute my vision on my own. I now have a much greater respect for other DIY-ers and especially my dad. Thank you for the help!

finished product - voila!

Originally written by Kimberly for St. Louis AT HOME’s website.  View the post here.  You can see more of Kimberly’s work here.

Guest Post: 5 Things You Won’t Learn From Cable TV by Cary Baumann

A&E and HGTV still haven’t called, nor have their cameras ever appeared at one of the many properties I “flipped” or rehabbed.

I’ve been at it longer than these stations have existed: buying foreclosed and distressed properties fixing them up, staging them and selling the property for a profit. It did surprise me that someone found flipping real estate to be worthy of a television show until I saw a few of these shows. Suddenly the way I rehabbed felt very boring.

I never removed kitchen cabinets with an axe. In fact I haven’t done any demolition work with an axe. I have never convened with my posse in a large black SUV. I have never gotten in a physical altercation with any of my contractors. But, I have had insects rain on me like a spring storm. I also have encountered smells that are beyond description and scenes that are not suitable for television. So, now you know why the cameras haven’t shown up.

Staging Your Home To Sell and Other Real Estate Investing Tips

Those of you wanting to try your hand at real estate investing should know that if cameras did follow me the show would be very different. Here a few things I’ve done that the cameras may have missed.

Get Mentors.
My network of friendly competitors and mentors contributes the most to the success of my business. Viewers never see Armando call his mentor when he gets in a bind. I have a feeling his mentor may suggest he not engage in fist fights with contractors.

Use Professionals.
Take pride in your rehabs, adopt the philosophy “if the job is worth doing, it’s worth doing well”. We are lucky in the St. Louis area to have such skilled trades, so call your mentors and find out who they recommend. Use ASID designers for staging as well as kitchen and bath design. Use structural engineers. Use Realtors for marketing. Unlike the television shows, my projects go relatively smooth. I owe this to the slew of talented people that help me with my rehabs. If the television experts used professionals they would know that not staging at all is better than bad staging (and axes are for lumberjacks).

Make a Great First Impression. 
Great, not good. Good isn’t great enough. My clients are always anxious to hurry and get their projects on the market. Seeing how far a project has come, a client frequently sees it as ready to go. The competition may have started from an entirely different place. That’s why yours must be great. A buyer isn’t going to come back and take a second look if she wasn’t impressed after the first visit. The taping schedule forces TV projects to hold open houses while the paint is still drying or flooring still needs to be laid. Don’t lose your patience at the end and give buyers the impression that you hastily threw the entire project together.

Don’t Get Greedy.
Price your project to sell quickly; there’s no prize for the house that sits on the market the longest. Your first offer could be your only offer, so try to make a deal. Not all projects are winners. You may have to take an offer that makes you pick up your lemons and move on to the next project to make lemonade. After the television show ends you don’t always know what price the property fetched or if it even sold at all. Many investors will turn a rehab project that is not selling into a rental and attempt to sell in a better market. Being a landlord is very different than being a rehabber, but both are very real possibilities.

Don’t Stop Doing What Made You Successful. 
Be disciplined to stick to the systems you have refined that have produced the desired results. I suppose the television personalities had to realize some level of success in real estate to attract the attention of producers. Though their television antics are entertaining, I would find it hard to believe that the behavior exhibited is the most profitable and efficient way to rehab houses. If you want to be a successful real estate investor, think of the overall process of rehabbing as a routine elimination of weaknesses. Initially you may not fetch the price you want because you overlooked certain things. But as you learn from your mistakes, you’ll eliminate your weak points, and the end result will be a smooth and efficient rehabbing method that will consistently earn a profit.

If you’re interested in rehabbing, and you have realistic expectations and a good work ethic–give it a try. The risks can be high, but currently there are a lot of properties available and prices have sunk to rock bottom. The prices of large black SUVs have also come down.

Interior Designer Cary Baumann’s company, Cary and Company, LLC, was voted BEST Staging Company by St. Louis AT HOME Magazine.

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